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Congress Park

Denver's Perfect 10 Neighborhoods

—  Denver’s Perfect 10 Neighborhoods

Congress Park
Congress Park
Facebook Twitter Gmail reddit LinkedIn From Indian land to City Suburb (1850-1900) Up through the Pikes Peak gold rush of the 1850’s, the Congress Park area was Native American land. By 1860 the young city of Denver had grown to a population of 5,000, with six men to every woman. As the first stagecoaches were […]

From Indian land to City Suburb (1850-1900)

Up through the Pikes Peak gold rush of the 1850’s, the Congress Park area was Native American land. By 1860 the young city of Denver had grown to a population of 5,000, with six men to every woman. As the first stagecoaches were arriving in Denver in the late 1850’s, William Larimer, one of the city’s founders, sited the park-like Mount Prospect Cemetery on a prominent hill to reinforce the image of Denver as a refined city. The area the cemetery encompassed evolved over the next 100 years into the present-day Cheesman Park, the Morgan Addition, Denver Botanic Gardens, the Denver Waterboard Reservoirs, and Congress Park, for which our neighborhood is named. The coming of the railroad through Denver in 1870 paralleled another sudden surge in growth. Between 1880 and 1890 the city’s population boomed from over 35,000 to nearly 107,000. Through the 1880’s Denver’s air was so polluted because of unpaved roads, coal and wood furnaces, smelting and other industries that wealthy residents looked to the outskirts of Denver, such as Capitol Hill, for cleaner air and reclaimed mountain views. With the expansion of public transit, including cable cars, to Colfax Avenue in the late 1880’s and early 1890’s, the eastern reaches of Capitol Hill became more accessible to the middle class. Because Colfax was the main route downtown, homes were first built along its corridor to the north (now City Park South neighborhood) and to the south (now Congress Park neighborhood).  This house was located at 2839 E. Colfax Between 1887 and 1888, our neighborhood was completely platted into more than ten subdivisions of various sizes. On March 11, 1889, the area was incorporated into Denver as part of a larger annexation by the city. It was also in the late 1880’s and early 1890’s that many of the street names in the neighborhood were renamed eg., Charles to Garfield, Cleveland to Fillmore to simplify and avoid duplicate street names which were causing confusion for the expanding city utility and emergency services. Just a test of the emergency broadcast system…

11801
Total Population
$52,237
Median Income Per Resident
42%
% owner occupied (vs. renters)
34.3
Median Resident Age
$79,312
Median Income Per Household
94%
% homes occupied (vs. vacant)
Ethnicity

Education

Age of Resident